Woodland Watch – Week 11 – 29/05/2013

Approaching the woodland through the beautiful meadows I couldn’t help but take some photos for woodland watch! Although the surrounding meadows are very different to the woodland area, they have a large impact on the woodland environment, especially given the small size of the wooded area.

Here you can see the meadow approaching the coppice area.

Meadow approaching the coppice

Meadow approaching the coppice

Eight small meadows surround the coppice and are an excellent example of how meadows used to be before intensification made them the rarity they are today. The site has been protected as a SSSI as a high quality hay meadow.

But what does this have to do with the woodland? The answer is simple. No environment can be taken as independent of its surroundings. Habitats do not simply observe the boundaries between themselves with woodland species staying in the woodland and meadow species staying in the meadow. The ecological boundary or transition zone between the two habitats is known as the ecotone.

EcotonesGrassland species will extend as far as they can until they are out competed by the woodland species. Woodland species will extend as far as they can until they are out competed by the woodland species. Between the two habitats is an area of intense competition where species of both habitats compete for space and nutrients.

As you enter the woodland, a hedgerow and grassy stream bank comprise the ecotone between the hay meadow and the coppice woodland. Back during the winter months, these banks were sparsely vegetated at a low level. Now, the vegetation is well over a metre high.

Ecotone between the coppice woodland and the surrounding hay meadow

Ecotone between the coppice woodland and the surrounding hay meadow

The boundary comprises a mix of both woodland and meadow vegetation and at this time of year Cow Parsley (Anthriscus sylvestrisis one of the most abundant plants. Cow Parsley is a hollow-stemmed, tall plant that grows rapidly in the summer before dying back. It likes shady habitats in particular, and can be found decorating woodland edges, roadside verges and hedgerows with masses of frothy, white flowers.

A native wildflower which is often considered a weed, cow parsley is nevertheless a valuable species, providing important links in the food chain for many other animals, as well as areas for shelter and material for nesting.

On entering the woodland, the first thing I noticed was the dramatic colour change. Last week, the floor was a carpet of bluebells, in just the space of a week, the woodland floor has changed dramatically from blue to green.

The green woodland floor is a dramatic change from last week's carpet of bluebells

The green woodland floor is a dramatic change from last week’s carpet of bluebells

While some of these beautiful spring flowers still remain, we will have to wait for next year to see their flush of spring colour again. Some estimates suggest the UK has up to half of the world’s total bluebell population and 71% of native bluebells are found in broadleaved woodland or scrub.

Emerging out the other side of the woodland back into the hay meadow SSSI, it was lovely to look back and finally see the oak trees in full leaf. With the poor weather this spring, the oaks were one of the last species to come into leaf and I’m sure you agree they look beautiful here in the sunshine.

Oak trees now in leaf on the boundary of the coppice woodland

Oak trees now in leaf on the boundary of the coppice woodland

Well, that’s all we have have time for this week’s walk in the woods. Hope you can join us next week and see what changes are happenning!

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