The Treecreeper Arborists Guide to Looking After Your New Tree

Thank you for coming to talk to us at North Nibley Music Festival and here’s your guide to planting your new tree!

Following the expert advice you have been given in selecting your sapling, you should have a suitable species for your chosen site. Remember, trees are like children – you have to nurture them to help them grow up big and healthy.

Ok, you have your little sapling clutched firmly, and you want it to become a successful tree, so after all the work you will put into it over the next few years it will result in a nice patch of shade to relax in.

Relaxing under a tree

Relaxing under a tree

Firstly, make sure that the roots don’t dry out. We have gone to great lengths to ensure there is minimal disruption to the root system, but there is inevitably some damage to the very fine roots which do all the hard work like taking in water and dissolved nutrients in the soil. These are really important, and each time the tree is moved, more damage occurs to these roots.

At this time of year, the trees are using a fair amount of water, with moisture evaporating from the stomatal pores in the leaves which pull water up from the roots via capillary action. This means the water demand is really important. Ideally, trees should be moved over the winter, when the water demand is much lower, and the tree can cope with the shock more easily.

So in order to ensure the roots have their best chance of survival (and therefore the tree), we must give it the optimal growing conditions. This means digging a hole. It doesn’t have to be too big, as a rule of thumb you can work on around about four times the size of the root ball. You won’t have to dig deep either, as burying the roots too deep will kill or severely weaken the tree. Make sure when you settle the tree in the hole that the point where the roots start to spread out from the stem is at ground level.  Your hole should have gently sloping sides, which if your soil is clay based may become glazed by the back of the spade.This creates a barrier to the roots spreading out, so just loosen the soil all around the edge of the planting pit a little with the edge of the spade.

Digging the hole for your tree

Digging the hole for your tree

Put a bit of nice soft soil or compost in the bottom of the hole, enough to raise the tree to the correct height. While you can still see the roots, and want to use a stake (or a cane) now is the time. Push it down, making sure the roots are missed.  Now fill the rest of the hole with your nice soft soil, and give your tree a bit of a jiggle up and down, which will make sure all the little nooks and crannies are filled with soil. Firm the soil lightly as you go, until you reach the correct height. Stand up, admire your work.

Now, you can give your tree in its new home a good watering, until there is a bit of standing water on the surface of the soil. Depending on whether or not you feel like it, put a bit of mulch around the base. This both keeps the weeds down around the tree so it has less competition for nutrients, and also helps to retain moisture in the soil, so when we have our next hosepipe ban (you know, just before the flooding starts) there is a bit less watering to do. For mulch, just about anything will do. A bit of woodchip, grass cuttings, straw, bits of cardboard or even offcuts of carpet.

DSC00575_000

Now you have successfully planted your tree we hope it gives you many years of pleasure.  Remember, the best time to plant a tree is twenty years ago. The second best time is now . . .

For more information on looking after your trees at any stage of life, or if you get stuck planting your new tree, contact the Treecreeper team on 01453 844038 or email us at office@tree-creeper.com.

For more information about Treecreeper Arborists Ltd, head to our website at

http://www.tree-creeper.com

Woodland Watch – Week 14 – 19/06/2013

It seems as fast as I get used to warm spring/summer weather everything turns around and its back to miserable grey again! This week wasn’t great weather for a walk in the woods, but me and the dog made it out anyway and here’s what we saw this week!

Despite the dreary looking sky and cold, blustery wind that felt more like early spring than early summer, the meadow approaching the woodland was still beautiful, covered in buttercups and a wide range of flora.

Stormier skies than in previous weeks as we approached the woodland

Stormier skies than in previous weeks as we approached the woodland

The buttercup family is comprised of about 2,252 species, including wildflowers and ornamentals, such as larkspur, marsh marigold and clematis. It used to be thought that the rich yellow of the buttercup made better butter from cows feeding in buttercup-rich meadows. This is a myth however, as we now know that the stem and leaf are actually toxic, especially to cattle, and the animals avoid eating it.

The meadow is full of a wide variety of flowers, herbs, grasses etc and I am the first to admit that my meadow species identification needs a lot of work, so please feel free to correct any mistakes!!! Species such as the common plantain and clover are widespread among the buttercups.

Ground level vegetation in the meadow approaching the woodland

Ground level vegetation in the meadow approaching the woodland

Inside the wood, the woodland floor has changed again. The green bluebell leaves from previous weeks have turned yellow and collapsed as they come to the end of their life for this year. The stems and seed pods are still upright, bare looking without their foliage.

Bluebell stems left after the leaves have wilted

Bluebell stems left after the leaves have wilted

While these areas of the woodland look bare now that the bluebells have died back, other areas are overrun with weeds. On entering the woodland area there are large patches of young brambles which will continue to dominate the vegetation where they can through the summer months.

Young brambles taking over the area close to the entrance to the woods

Young brambles taking over the area close to the entrance to the woods

Although generally considered a woody week and certainly difficult to eradicate once they become established, brambles are a very useful plant to a wide range of wildlife. Hundreds of creatures use brambles at different times of the year: Insects visit the flowers for pollen and nectar, including bumblebees, honey bees, hoverflies, wasps, butterflies, moths, flies and lacewings.Spiders spin webs to catch the bounty of visiting insects. Moths such as buff arches, peach blossom and fox moths lay their eggs on bramble as it is their larval foodplant. Blackbirds, thrushes, chaffinches, starlings, robins, pheasants, foxes, mice and other small mammals eat the fruits. Robins, wrens, thrushes, blackbirds, warblers and finches will nest in bramble and small mammals use it for protection from predators.

A weed the bramble may be, but it is certainly a very valuable woodland plant as long as it is not allowed to out compete other valuable vegetation. The key to any habitat is variety.

That’s it for this week. Join us again next week for another walk in the woods.

http://www.tree-creeper.com

Woodland Watch – Week 9 – 15/05/2013

Welcome to another week in the woods. I’m sure I don’t need to tell anyone that the weather so far this spring is very unpredictable! So far I have been very lucky with my weekly woodland walks and have managed to do all of them in dry weather, but I think that probably has more to do with careful timing than anything else!

The woodland is made up mainly of hazel coppice with a range of standards dotted throughout but mainly around the edges of the woodland area. It was lovely to see the oaks starting to come into leaf. In folklaw the saying goes “If the oak before the ash, then we’ll only have a splash, if the ash before the oak, then we’ll surely have a soak.” This year however, the ash and oak have both held on for a long time before bursting into leaf and when they have they have appeared around the same time. I will leave you to draw your own conclusions as to what this could herald for the coming summer!

Oak standards on the woodland edge

Oak standards on the woodland edge

After a slow start the oak standards around the woodland are now starting to come into leaf. The oak tree has a wide range of qualities suitable for healing purposes. If ground into fine powder, oak bark can be taken like snuff to stop nosebleeds. It can also be sprinkled onto sheets to alleviate the discomfort of bedsores. Young oak leaf-buds were prepared in distilled water and taken inwardly to assuage inflammations and bruised oak leaves are used outwardly, being applied to wounds and hemorrhoids to ease inflammations.

Another plant with a great range of uses including medicinal is the common nettle (Urtica dioica). Seen emerging and starting to take hold in previous weeks, the banks of the stream bordering the woodland are now overrun with thick, impenetrable stinging nettles which are now out-competing most other flora in the area.

Stinging nettles overrunning the borders of the woodland

Stinging nettles overrunning the borders of the woodland

Around the woodland floor, the male ferns which were seen emerging with curled fronds in previous weeks are now fully unfurled and growing quickly.

Young ferns now unfurled and growing rapidly

Young ferns now unfurled and growing rapidly

Among the many weed species taking hold all over the woodland floor are the dandelions. Much less prevalent than in the surrounding open meadows and field, but nonetheless still present.

Young dandelion leaves nestled among the other ground flora

Young dandelion leaves nestled among the other ground flora

The word Dandelion comes from the French name for the plant dents de lion meaning teeth of the lion and refers to the jagged edges of the leaf of the plant. The other French name for this plant is pis-en-lit, in English this means wet the bed. Dandelions deserve this name because their greens, when eaten, remove water from the body. So eating the greens could cause someone to well… you can guess the rest. Not recommend for a bedtime snack.

The Dandelion provides an important food source to bees. The pollen from this plant helps bees out in the spring because it flowers early and the flowers continue through to the fall providing constant food. In fact no less then 93 different kinds of insects use Dandelion pollen as food. The Dandelion seeds are also important food to many small birds.

Join us next week for a wander through the woods with Woodland Watch Week 10

Woodland Watch – Week 4 – 10/04/2013

Another week, another walk in the woods and thankfully there’s no denying that spring is finally here! The weather is warmer, the buds are starting to burst, the spring flowers are starting to agree that it is time to come out. After a long, cold and particularly dreary winter, it is wonderful to watch the woodland coming alive again with the signs of spring.

This week, I spent a lot of time looking at the many pieces of deadwood scattered around the woodland. All too often, woodlands and gardens are ‘tidied up’. Deadwood is looked upon as something to be removed. In some cases, removal is necessary to ensure safety however, when it is safe to do so, deadwood should be maintained as vital habitat.

photo (11)

Deadwood such as this cracked stem provides valuable woodland habitat

Removing or burning rotting timber can destroy valuable invertebrate habitat. Wherever possible, fallen, rotting wood should be left undisturbed where it falls. Fallen branches and other lying deadwood should be maintained in situ unless they pose a danger to the public. 

This woodland is full of both lying and standing deadwood and while it may look untidy, it is important to remember that nature is rarely “tidy”. Often the best habitats are found in areas that humans, with our inclination to impose order on our environment, leave unmanaged.

Standing deadwood, left in situ, providing a wealth of invertebrate habitat

Standing deadwood, left in situ, providing a wealth of invertebrate habitat

For more information on deadwood habitat, take a look at this publication from the Forestry Commission:

http://www.forestry.gov.uk/pdf/lifeinthedeadwood.pdf/$file/lifeinthedeadwood.pdf

The same flowers could be seen dotted around the woodland floor as in previous weeks, however there were noticeably more of them this week. Primroses and wood anemones blanket patches of the woodland floor and the brilliant green of the bluebell leaves shone in the bright sunlight.

Primroses are springing up all over the woodland floor

Primroses are springing up all over the woodland floor

For this walk, I decided to take the left hand circular path to make a change from the other routes I have taken and came across these rabbit holes. Out of interest, I loosely crossed some sticks over the entrance to the holes to find out whether they were in use.

Loosely crossed sticks over a rabbit hole to test whether it was in use

Loosely crossed sticks over a rabbit hole to test whether it was in use

Sure enough, the following day when i went back to check, the sticks had been pushed aside and fresh rabbit droppings were observed around the area.

Yesterday's sticks pushed aside by rabbit activity in/out of this hole

Yesterday’s sticks pushed aside by rabbit activity in/out of this hole

Joining the splashes of spring colour on the woodland floor are the lesser celandines  (Ranunculus ficaria) which have now started to make an appearance. A perennial member of the buttercup family, these native British flowers are widespread in woods, hedgerows and on the banks of streams.

Lesser celandines adding to the spring colour on the woodland floor

Lesser celandines adding to the spring colour on the woodland floor

Join us next week for another walk in the woods. Until then, send us your pictures of your spring walks in the woods to office@tree-creeper.com or post them on our facebook page.

Tree Planting – An Act of Altruism

It is often said that “The best time to plant a tree is 20 years ago…The second best time is now”. Tree planting is undertaken widely across the UK from large scale woodland planting and regeneration schemes to the planting of individual trees, often to commemorate a loved one or a special occasion. We often look upon trees as a constant in our world. The ancient oaks in our woodlands could tell a wealth of stories about the comings and goings of humans and our short lived lives.

My 2 year old Oak seedling grown from an acorn

My 2 year old Oak seedling grown from an acorn

So why do we plant trees? I have an oak seedling grown from an acorn picked up from a

woodland floor on a particularly memorable day in my life. 20 years from now I will be 45 years old and this tree will still be an infant in the grand scheme of its potential lifetime. It will reach its prime long after my life has come to an end and I will only ever get to share a tiny proportion of its time on earth. Yet I care for it, nurture it and when it is big enough I will plant it in a place where I hope it will grow for hundreds of years. 

Perhaps the trees we plant are one of the great acts of altruism on our planet. The time and money that we spend on them will often have very little impact on our own lives but our actions will shape the earth around us for future generations.

But what happens after planting? So often we buy a tree with all of the best intentions. We plant it, we carefully tend it, we mulch around its base and keep the weeds at bay. We stake it and tie it for support and then we sit back and wait for it to grow and mature. In far too many cases, this marks the end of our involvement in the tree and its life. As a result, trees which have the potential to shape our landscape and become a valuable part of the earth’s ecosystems end up like this:

Neglected young trees

These trees photographed in Pilning, South Gloucestershire have been planted and then neglected, leading to the tree ties constricting the growing tree causing irreversible damage.

When we plant a tree, it is vitally important that this is only the first chapter of care. In many ways, young trees are like children. Your investment in their life cannot end at birth. A growing child requires many years of care, nurture and training for it to reach its full potential. The same applies to a planted tree. The trees pictured above were part of a copse, probably planted with the best intentions. The effort and financial investment made in buying, planting and staking the trees has now been completely wasted as the damage caused by neglect is irreversible.

Staking newly planted trees is important to prevent wind rock and root movement as the tree becomes established in its new environment. A naturally growing tree in a woodland has spent many years establishing itself and laying down a strong, wide reaching root system. Artificially planted trees need time to settle into their new position and establish their root systems. A child uprooted from somewhere it has lived for many years being placed into a new environment needs support to settle in, trees are the same.

However, it is vital that staked trees are monitored and cared for to ensure that they help rather than hinder the growing tree. Ties must be carefully monitored to ensure they are providing support, but not constricting the tree’s growth or rubbing. Stakes must be monitored and replaced as necessary and care must be taken to ensure that as the tree grows it is staked in the correct place. Too low and the wind rock in the developing canopy causes root movement damaging the fine root hairs. Too high and the tree has no need to support itself and fails to develop a strong root support system.

For more detailed information on correct staking techniques visit: http://apps.rhs.org.uk/advicesearch/Profile.aspx?pid=208

In today’s society, so many of us lead fast paced lives but the trees we plant and nurture will far outlive us and will stand as a testament to our lives for centuries to come. It is so important that we remember that while tree planting is a worthwhile and valuable investment, it is wasted if we fail to provide ongoing care. The time we spend managing and caring for our trees should be viewed as our own personal investment in the future of our arboricultural world. Our trees are the key to our own lives on this planet, the very least we can do is care for them and help them to survive in a world in which our actions make their environment an increasingly hostile one.